Open discussion about ILM and the magic they create. Also VFX and movies in general. Anyone can post topics here.

Moderator: malducin

User avatar
By ShaneP
#34365
Okay, I have confirmed this. The Cynic or someone else pointed out that an ILMer on twitter noted ILM worked on it. I looked into it further and, yes, they did work on it.

But why hasn't ILM even acknowledged that they worked on it? Even during the bake-offs and shortlists came up, they said they were honored to have worked on films but made no mention of First Man.

Even if it was a single shot you would think they would at least publicly say "Thanks for including us in this project....yada,yada,yada."

Their Art Department is credited on films where they contribute to the conceptual and design of films too.

Can NDAs even forbid a company from acknowledging working on a film? I thought NDAs forbid individuals talking about specific things such as shots and behind the scenes.

Maybe Kevin can help out here? He has worked with people in the industry for years and can likely answer the extent to which NDAs can apply.

Why are certain films and projects seemingly not acknowledged and buried? Okay, I can understand burying a movie like RIPD....ahem...but there are others going all the way back to the Return of the Jedi era. The Keep is one and Conan the Barbarian is another. And just last year ILM have no acknowledgement that they worked on The Other Side of the Wind's completion. They have a working relationship with Netflix so it seems like they wouldn't keep ILM from even mentioning it.
Last edited by ShaneP on Thu Jan 17, 2019 7:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
By Kmart
#34376
Are you sure ILM isn't mention for WIND? They were definitely in the press notes, or at least Knoll was.

In the 80s, ILM helped somebody do some stuff for ROBOCOP; it was in CINEFEX but went uncredited (and I don't think there is a thankyou in the credits.

Not sure if that is any help, but remember, decades later I'm still trying to figure out why motion-control stage work cost so much that it made it easy for everybody to abandon it in favor of CGI.
User avatar
By ShaneP
#34377
Are you sure ILM isn't mention for WIND? They were definitely in the press notes, or at least Knoll was.

In the 80s, ILM helped somebody do some stuff for ROBOCOP; it was in CINEFEX but went uncredited (and I don't think there is a thankyou in the credits.

Not sure if that is any help, but remember, decades later I'm still trying to figure out why motion-control stage work cost so much that it made it easy for everybody to abandon it in favor of CGI.
Sorry but I wasn't clear enough when I mentioned ILM not mentioning The Other Side of the Wind. I meant on their website. They were featured a bit too and shown in the behind the scenes documentary on the restoration documentary too. And also, why not mention some projects like this one, First Man? It just seems odd and I wondered if there is a real legal reason(NDA) are precluded from mentioning them.

Did ILM help Tippett on Robocop? That's the first I've heard they helped on that one.
By Kmart
#34379
I think they helped Pete Kuran, not Tippett. It may have been something about plates getting processed quickly as a favor -- it was in CINEFEX 32, that's all I recall.
User avatar
By ShaneP
#34380
I think they helped Pete Kuran, not Tippett. It may have been something about plates getting processed quickly as a favor -- it was in CINEFEX 32, that's all I recall.
Unfortunately, I dont have that issue. I have some from 86-87 onwards, but not that one.
By Kmart
#34383
You probably ought to pop for the digital collection -- it'd be a business expense for your contributions and time to the website, right?
User avatar
By ShaneP
#34384
You probably ought to pop for the digital collection -- it'd be a business expense for your contributions and time to the website, right?
Hah! I wish. Yeah, maybe Cinefex could comp me one? I became a subscriber back with the Nightmare Before Christmas issue in late 93-early 94 and then found out about all the back issues they had listed in the back. I ordered BOXES of them, from 86 all the way up to Jurassic Park. It was a cornucopia of fx knowledge and insight! I loved it.

But yeah, I'm not a huge fan of ebooks. One reason why I never made the plunge for the digital collection. Plus, many of those issues I already own by now.