Open discussion about ILM and the magic they create. Also VFX and movies in general. Anyone can post topics here.

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#30844
Thanks to aslan I got to thinking about this.

I watched Falling Skies last season and they had this alien leader on there. He looked great I thought but didn't really think anything more of it. Then aslan mentioned the hybrid approach to makeup fx and mentioned this show. I remember the show and the few episodes I watched last year with the alien leader in it. Turns out FXguide has a cool Q&A with Masters Fx, the people behind the makeup and digital hybrid work.

Here's the link:
http://www.fxguide.com/quicktakes/creat ... ing-skies/

The work really is terrific on the show. You don't really think of technique because it disappears. It's like Davey Jones, who was so good the technique or CG-ness of the character evaporated. Its just a really great character.

So, is this the way of the future for makeup fx practitioners and practical fx people?

I'm really hoping, perhaps in vain, the Star Wars team at Lucasfilm is pushing this sort of craft for the new films and not settling for the traditional sharp SW demarcation line of CG character, really fluid and expressive……and then the makeup mask stuck on a guys head with limited expression etc.

I hope the team at Club JJ and Team Kennedy are pushing this sort of blend for makeup fx they do use in any sort of prominent way.

Interestingly, Falling Skies is produced by longtime Kennedy cohort Mr. Spielberg.

Is this the way forward for makeup fx and animatronic work?

I would submit that it is. IMHO, it is the only way for makeup fx of the creature character sort to remain viable and still base their work on the craft they know and love. Sure, there will still be a necessity for basic makeup work. But the makeup fx and creature work will have to adopt this hybrid approach to remain a viable alternative to the all-CG approach the major fx houses now all offer, almost exclusively. They don't have the practical divisions anymore. ILM had one of the last and they were spunoff nearly 8 years ago. They can't offer this solution.

So hopefully Masters fx is just the first of many of the remaining makeup fx and animatronic creature facilities to adopt this approach.

The results are terrific.
Last edited by ShaneP on Sun Jun 12, 2016 12:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
#30854
Excellent post Shane, and nice article from fxguide.

I agree that this seems to be a viable way forward for creating characters, and as the process develops both the cg and practical elements will be able to contribute more towards the end result. I can see it being possible to not just do fairly humanoid characters, but full body, completely alien creatures too. Or imagine on the set of JP4 moving a full scale, lightweight t-rex around the set,( I'm thinking of the ones used in the walking with dinosaurs live show), knowing that cg can then essentially animate it to reality. Having the practical underpinning always makes the cg look more natural and organic. And it's got to be more cost efficient than full cg ? Especially for television budgets. It also overcomes the actors complaint about acting to nothing.

I think another great example of this sort of thing is the aged Peggy in Cap2. Whilst I felt aware that something might be going on, I wasn't sure what. It feels like early days for this sort of digital manipulation, but it's only going to get better and is the true blend of cg and practical on screen, eliminating the awkward cutting between two disciplines that has always been noticeable.
#30859
Excellent post Shane, and nice article from fxguide.

I think another great example of this sort of thing is the aged Peggy in Cap2. Whilst I felt aware that something might be going on, I wasn't sure what. It feels like early days for this sort of digital manipulation, but it's only going to get better and is the true blend of cg and practical on screen, eliminating the awkward cutting between two disciplines that has always been noticeable.
Great example for digital makeup! I love Lola's work. So you saw Cap 2 on the big screen too? I saw it twice. I didn't even notice both times. I just thought Atwell was in excellent old age makeup. Like really good old age makeup. The I listened to fxguide's coverage and the articles. Lola's work just blows me away. I think they actually took textures of the old actress stand in and projected them onto Atwell's face.

The issue with old age practical makeup, even the best by Baker and Smith, was it was always about additions. You had to add stuff to the face. Well, as a consequence it makes the face look fuller and, thus, younger. Casting was critical in those cases. And Baker and Dick Smith were the best at all of that.

Lola's masterful work can subtract and make people appear as frail and fragile as the filmmaker wants(Skinny Steve is another example of their work I love).

You can imagine a really true practical artist like a Baker taking a hybrid approach. Create the very best makeup on the actress or on a study and then digitally applying those practically-created textures to the actual actresses face to his and the filmmakers satisfaction. He could then add or subtract as much practical as he wanted. Same for bigger folks and youthful appearances.